North from London on the northern bank of the river Tyne and only 13.7 km from the North Sea is located this vivid english city with the people of a bit hard to understand dialect Geordie.

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Royal Theatre – georgian style

The city developed around the Roman settlement Pons Aelius and was named after the castle built in 11 century by the son of  William the Conqueror. In the 14th century, the city became important centre for the wool trade and later a major coal mining area. The port developed in the 16th century and, along the river Tyne.

Amongst its icons the famous are Newcastle United football club and the Tyne Bridge.

What I will remember the most about this city was the night life. Apparently Newcastle upon Tyne’s nightlife is Great Britain’s no. 1 tourist attraction. And I am not saying it because of the big concentrations of pubs, bars and nightclubs around the Bigg Market and the Quayside area of the city centre popularly referred to as the ‘Diamond Strip,’ but because of the youngsters and their way of understanding the nightlife fashion. Well… decide by yourself:

Anyways, the last day of my visit to Newcastle, my friend and I took the local train and made a day trip to Tynemouth – a town, historic borough and nature site, dating back to an Iron Age, middle ages and then being strategically very important during War War ll. It is the place where the river Tyne flows into North sea.

Tynemouth Castle is combined with the ruins of the Benedictine priory where early kings of Northumbria were buried. The ruins are dating from 8th century.

For the rest of the day, my friend and I simply enjoyed the pier, the view on the North sea and the wind in our hair.

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