Krakow is one of the most culturally and politically significant cities in Poland. Although you could easily spend a few happy days in Krakow and fill your time with a variety of entertaining activities; one day is enough to take in the city’s top ‘must-see’ attractions.

Traditionally it has been one of the leading centres of Polish academic, cultural, and artistic life and is one of Poland’s most important economic hubs. It was the capital of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland from 11-16 century, Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 16 – 18 century, then the Free City of Kraków in 19 century; and Grand Duchy of Cracow until early 20 century.

My brother and I arrived early in the morning and wandered the Old town first and the main market square. It dates back to the 13th century and is one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe.

It was surrounded by historic townhouses and churches. The center of the square is dominated by the Cloth Hall (polish Sukiennice).  On one side of the cloth hall is the Town Hall Tower (polish Wieża ratuszowa), on the other the 10th century Church of St. Adalbert and 1898 Adam Mickiewicz Monument – the greatest polish romantic poet.

After so many sites at the main square, we climbed to the hill where the Wawel castle is placed, built at the behest of King Casimir III the Great in the 13 century. In the 14th century it was rebuilt by Jadwiga of Poland (also known as Hedwig) – the first female monarch of the Kingdom of Poland. Part of the castle is the very known Wawel cathedral as well.

krakow-wawel-cathedral

From the castle’s courtyard entrance the view shoots on the river Vistula, the largest river in Poland.

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